Finding Career “Luck”

“I only work my hours and don’t want to think about my job a minute longer.” No matter where you sit in your organization, we all need to maintain our work/life boundaries. Keeping priorities clear and negotiating requests is all part of it. I meet too many clients who are frustrated that their careers are stalled, but are unwilling to take ownership for them and do something about it.  You do know that you care the most about your career, right?

Where does managing your career fall in your priorities?  You cannot it leave it up to your boss to notice all your good work and create a career path for you.  The more I talk with boomers about their careers, I hear that “luck” was a factor in getting new opportunities. Yet, they had said “yes” to go to a meeting, or present, or join a group that enabled them to share their ideas and to help others get what they needed. You can work this into your normal work hours. But to really get things moving, you need to invest a bit more time so the right people know who you are and what you can do for them. Since most of us no longer spend our careers at one organization, you need to be an active member of your professional associations, events and groups where the people who can help you hang out.

Yesterday I had the honor of meeting Judy Robinett, one of the most well-connected people on the planet! She explains luck as overcoming your fears, assumptions and beliefs to get yourself in the place and time you need to meet the people who can help you.  This may start with a text or email, but nearly always requires some face-to-face conversations.

During your work day, what do you do to explore your next options? Who do you talk to and what do they know about what you’d really like to be doing? If you stick to your desk and small circle of colleagues you’re missing opportunities to meet the people who may be able to help you with your goals.

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